Dynamic performance control from bmw should improve curve behavior

Dynamic performance control from bmw should improve curve behavior

Miramas (France), 9. July 2007 – Why, BMW likes to call the rear drive as standard drive? The corporate spokesman laughs and says: Think of the long rear extremities of rabbits or Kangurus. Who can run quickly in nature, which is usually with the hind legs gas. Well, and so it’s just with the cars, so the speaker. There may be something, although in winter we have already seen some rear shooters who stuck in the snow. The best traction delivers just the four-wheel drive. But some drivers complain about the substeer term of four-wheelers. This shortcoming is aimed to fix a new rear axle transmission called BMW as Dynamic Performance Control. We could try the innovation already in an X5 research vehicle.

Optimal torque distribution on the rear axle

Behind the term Dynamic Performance Control hides a mechanical-electronic system, which is independent of the engine power the continuously variable distribution of the drive torque on the two rear rollers. This is called, in a left turn more force is passed on the right rear wheel, and in a right turn on the left rear wheel. This results, so to speak, a piloting rear axle. Because if you are "gas" on the curvature wheel "Gas", the car is of course easier to the curve. This principle is known to those skilled in the skills "Active YAW" or "Torque Vectoring". A similar system sets Honda in Legend under the name Super Handling Allwheel Drive (SH-AWD). Subaru and Mitsubishi use the like in motorsport. But the BMW system has a special feature: it distributes the moments not only under load, but also in the thrust operation or with the clutch. The system is suitable for all drive types. However, the Munchner manufacturer wants to use it, however, to eliminate the understeering end of all-wheelers.